William

Can hotels really over-respond to reviews? The review page for a given property on, say TripAdvisor, is a social space in its own way. If the host of the party (the hotel) is crowding out the conversation with a lot of jabber, it appears to turn people off from participating in the conversation, with the end result of guests writing fewer reviews.

There are no shortage of articles in the hospitality space regarding best practices for responding to reviews, but most of it boils down to this: respond to all of the negative ones, a few of the positive ones, and none of the average ones. But how does this behavior affect our Review KPIs, and especially the quantity of new reviews being written?

In another data-driven study we conducted, our analysis revealed these very actionable findings: Responding an “appropriate” percentage of the time can lift the quantity of incoming reviews by up to 35%. We also learned, however, that responding too often can have a noticeably less beneficial effect.

Why is this? Can hotels really over-respond to reviews? We don’t tend to think of it in these terms, but the review page for a given property on, say TripAdvisor, is a social space in its own way, an asynchronous meeting room, of sorts. If the host of the party (the hotel) is crowding out the conversation with a lot of jabber, it appears to turn people off from participating in the conversation, with the end result of guests writing fewer reviews. Note: Our tests were conducted with North American hotels. Cultural preferences might influence best practices elsewhere.

Read More at HotelMarketing,com and DigitalMarketingWorks.Com



0 responses so far ↓

  • There are no comments yet...Kick things off by filling out the form below.

Leave a Comment